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Lehigh Valley Live: Upper Mount Bethel Township supervisors hear arguments for bill of rights to ban sludge
by Lynn Ondrusek Lehigh Valley Live
April 15th, 2014
Upper Mount Bethel Township residents present a Community Bill of Rights Ordinance to their Township Supervisors to protect against the land application of sewage sludge.
Lehigh Valley Live: Upper Mount Bethel Township takes back plan to subsidize fertilizer
by Lynn OndrusekLehigh Valley Live
March 11th, 2014
Upper Mount Bethel Township residents urge Township Supervisors to adopt a Community Bill of Rights banning the spreading of sewage sludge at Monday's Board of Supervisors meeting.
Lehigh Valley Live: LETTER: Township bill of rights is a local grass-roots effort
by John GormanLehigh Valley Live
January 13th, 2014
More Upper Mount Bethel Township, PA, residents press their township supervisors to adopt a Community Bill of Rights banning the spreading of sewage sludge and protecting the community's health, safety, and welfare.
Lehigh Valley Live: LETTER: Upper Mount Bethel Township needs community bill of rights
by Randy I. StettlerLehigh Valley Live
January 11th, 2014
Upper Mount Bethel Township, PA, resident urges township supervisors to follow the will of the people: Adopt a Community Bill of Rights ordinance to stop the land application of sewage sludge and protect the community.
Lehigh Valley Live: LETTER: Accurate information essential in farm-sludge debate
by Caroline SnyderLehigh Valley Live
January 9th, 2014
Upper Mount Bethel Township resident urges consideration of facts and a Community Bill of Rights ordinance banning the spreading of sewage sludge to protect the community from the harmful practice.
WFMZ-TV 69 News: Community bill of rights pitched to Upper Mount Bethel supervisors
by Tom De MartiniWFMZ-TV 69 News
January 7th, 2014
Threatened with the spreading of sewage sludge, Upper Mount Bethel Township, PA, residents and supervisors consider a Community Bill of Rights ordinance banning fracking.
Lehigh Valley Live: Residents, Upper Mount Bethel Township supervisors hear argument for bill of rights that could block sludge spreading
by Lynn Ondrusek Lehigh Valley Live
January 6th, 2014
CELDF speaks to Upper Mount Bethel Township residents and supervisors regarding a Community Bill of Rights ordinance banning the spreading of sewage sludge.
Lehigh Valley Live: Upper Mount Bethel Township supervisors to hear argument for community bill of rights
by Lynn Ondrusek Lehigh Valley Live
January 5th, 2014
Upper Mount Bethel Township, PA, residents urge their township supervisors to adopt a Community Bill of Rights banning the spreading of sewage sludge.
Lehigh Valley Live: Residents hope to stop sludge spreading in Upper Mount Bethel Township
by Lynn Ondrusek Lehigh Valley Live
November 18th, 2013
Upper Mount Bethel Township residents in Pennsylvania ask CELDF for assistance in using a Community Bill of Rights to stop the spreading of sewage sludge in their township.
The Standard Speaker: Packer Twp. to revamp biosolids ordinance
by Mia LightThe Standard Speaker
September 5th, 2012
Packer Township no longer has an ordinance that outlaws the use of sewage sludge as soil fertilizer. But, according to the board of supervisors, a new, stronger ordinance will soon be in place....Board Chairman William Swineberg said...[that] supervisors have decided, on the advice of attorneys from the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund CELDF), to revoke the existing ordinance and prepare to adopt a stronger version of the law.
The Morning Call Easton Area News: Lower Mount Bethel rejects sludge ordinance
by Adam ClarkThe Morning Call Easton Area News
July 10th, 2012
Lower Mount Bethel Township has decided not to adopt a proposed ordinance banning the use of sludge on township farmland. The ordinance was presented to the township earlier this year by The Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, a Franklin County nonprofit organization that offers free legal advice. Though residents have asked the supervisors to take steps to limit or ban the use of sludge, the proposed ordinance has "absolutely no chance" of being upheld in court, solicitor Joseph Zator said.
Lehigh Valley Live: Lower Mount Bethel Township supervisors to seek legal advice on anti-sludge ordinance - UPDATE
by Andrew GeorgeThe Express Times
June 5th, 2012
The Lower Mount Bethel Township supervisors want advice from their solicitor before moving forward with a proposed ordinance banning sludge. On May 7, supervisors listened to Ben Price, a project director with the Mercersburg, Pa.-based Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, who informed them of possible steps to prevent the use of sludge, a human waste byproduct, as fertilizer in the township. Price suggested that with the help of his agency, an ordinance could be drafted stressing "rights-based" reasons for why sludge should not be permitted on township farms.
Lehigh Valley Live: Lower Mount Bethel Township may consider ordinance against further sludge applications
by Andrew GeorgeThe Express Times
May 8th, 2012
Though sludge has made its first appearance on one Lower Mount Bethel Township farm, supervisors may look to a legislative remedy to make sure there's no encore....On Monday night, supervisors listened to a presentation from Ben Price, a project director with the Mercersburg, Pa.-based Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, who informed them of possible steps to prevent further sludge application in the township....Price told supervisors Monday that with the help of his agency, an ordinance could be drafted stressing "rights-based" reasons for why sludge should not be permitted on township farms. Price argued that if the township believes sludge to be harmful and detrimental to members of its community, an ordinance banning it could be implemented.
Biosolids project on Hold in Schuylkill Township
by leslie Richardson (lrichardson@republicanherald.com)Republican & Herald
October 2nd, 2010
In 2006, Coal Creek Ranch, a sister company to Reading Anthracite, informed the Schuylkill Township supervisors of its intention to spread the material on abandoned pasture and timber land north of Route 209 between Tuscarora and the Odd Fellows Cemetery, according to a The Republican & Herald archives. The township received a letter from the DEP stating it had received and reviewed the application by Coal Creek and it was determined that the site was suitable for application of biosolids under the permit, as long as biosolids signs are posted to restrict access.
Slinging Sludge
by Mari MargilPlanning magazine
August 11th, 2010
CELDF's Mari Margil writes about how some Pennsylvania communities no longer allow sewage sludge to be spread on farmland — and how the state is now taking them to court. The article focuses on how and why communities are saying "no" to sludge, corporate constitutional rights, and "yes" to the rights of human and natural communities. Published in the August/September 2010 issue of Planning, copyright 2010 by the American Planning Association.
Lawsuit targets Packer biosolids law
by Tom RaganHazelton Standard-Speaker
March 26th, 2010
A recent Commonwealth Court ruling sends to trial a lawsuit that appears to be solely intended to protect a local municipality's ability to keep out biosolids or sludge.
Packer Township wins Round One of AG's sewer sludge suit
by Joe PaskoTimes News
March 24th, 2010
Round one of Packer Township's fight to regulate the use of sewage sludge within its boundaries has been won by the township, though the battle is just beginning.
Protesters Rally Against Sewage Sludge
by Tom JoyceYork Daily Record
March 9th, 2010
About 60 protesters at the state Capitol on Tuesday said the most dire predictions from five years ago were coming true and manifesting themselves in the form of toxic sewage sludge.
Shrewsbury changes sludge rules under pressure from AG's office
by CARL LINDQUISTThe York Dispatch
March 5th, 2010
Pressure from the state attorney general's office prompted Shrewsbury Township on Wednesday to loosen restrictions on the spread of sewage sludge as a fertilizer.
Shrewsbury Township supervisors vow to continue fight against sludge
by Barb KrebYork Daily Record
March 4th, 2010
"We'll enact this ordinance and go back to work to come up with an imaginative ordinance that has some teeth in it. We want to talk with the attorney general . He has ignored us throughout this whole thing, and we've had no opportunity to talk to him. Our concerns have not been heard."
Land Application of Sewage Sludge Is, By Law, Not a Normal Agricultural Operation under Act 38
by Community Environmental Legal Defense FundBrief of Respondents in Support of Preliminary Objections, Corbett v. Packer Township
February 5th, 2010
In order to qualify as an “unauthorized local ordinance” under Act 38, the ordinance must either “prohibit or limit a normal agricultural operation” or “restrict or limit the ownership structure of a normal agricultural operation.”
Sludge fertilizer plans raise concerns in Perry and Windsor townships
by Michelle ParkReading Eagle
January 16th, 2010
A farmer's plan to use sewage sludge as fertilizer in Perry and Windsor townships has some neighbors worried for their health.
Fighting sludge application ... Beccaria residents upset that officials reject ordinance
by Timothy NebgenThe Progress
April 8th, 2009
A hundred-plus residents in Beccaria Township left the municipal building red faced, tear-stained and generally disgusted with the board of supervisors last night for failing to act on a "Local Control, Sewage Sludge and Chemical Trespass Ordinance."
Packer supervisors defy AG on biosolids
by Sam GalskiStandard Speaker
October 15th, 2008
The Packer Township supervisors do not want the state Attorney General’s Office meddling in their efforts to regulate the use of biosolids.
Packer supers take stand on biosolids
by Mia LightStandard Speaker
September 17th, 2008
The fight in Packer Township isn’t just about biosolids anymore. It’s about the people’s right to self government.
Packer ordinance revision confronts attorney general
by Mia LightStandard Speaker
September 5th, 2008
Packer Township supervisors are poised to do battle with the state attorney general.
Packer biosolids battle continues
by Mia LightStandard Speaker
August 27th, 2008
The Packer Township Board of Supervisors is holding its ground in defense of its Local Control Sewage Sludge and Chemical Trespass Ordinance.
Dozens of Communities Adopt Resolutions Defending Local Self-Government
by Ben PriceCELDF
July 11th, 2008
Municipal governments across Pennsylvania are voting their support for the right of a small Schuylkill County Township to protect its citizens’ against corporations dumping sewage sludge in violation of their local law.
Letter to the Editor: Corbett’s stance on sludge opposed
by Annette EtchbergerRepublican Herald
July 9th, 2008
I say that democracy does not have a price tag.
Officials object to sludge argument
by Dustin PangonisRepublican Herald
July 4th, 2008
Branch Township passed a Land Application and Storage of Sewage Sludge Ordinance on Monday, and also voted on a resolution to support East Brunswick Township’s court case against Corbett, who says the ordinance is illegal and that the state, not local government, has the authority to regulate the use of sewage sludge.
Corbett: Municipalities should wait for sludge decision
by Ben WolfgangRepublican Herald
July 2nd, 2008
Corbett said the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), not local municipalities, determines what can or cannot be spread on farmlands.
Branch Twp. OKs sludge regulation
by Dustin PangonisRepublican Herald
July 1st, 2008
Ben Price, a projects director for the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund: “What we’re faced with now is where communities can either challenge that usurpation of local, self-governing authority, or they can take the sludge and learn to love it against their consent.”
Who can ban sludge? Court to rule
by Matt Birkbeck The Morning Call
June 29th, 2008
Jurisdiction: Township in Schuylkill County outlawed the fertilizer. State sued.
Supervisors adopt biosolids ordinance
by Liz PinkeyTimes News
June 12th, 2008
Packer Township supervisors became the latest local government to take up the fight against corporate dumping of biosolids within the township limits by adopting an ordinance similar to one already adopted by several Schuylkill townships, including Rush and East Brunswick, and the Borough of Tamaqua.
State agency pooh-poohs sludge worries
by Editorial BoardEvening Sun
June 6th, 2008
That's why we salute West Manheim Township officials who last month adopted a resolution to oppose the spreading of sludge on farm fields in the township, even though state law curtails the power of local officials to stop the practice.
Packer Township seeks biosolids ordinance
by Joe PlaskoTimes News
May 14th, 2008
Packer Township in Carbon County will soon be joining Schuylkill communities such as Tamaqua, East Brunswick and Rush townships in adopting a local ordinance designed to prohibit the land application of sewer sludge within its boundaries.
Tamaqua joins E. Brunswick biosolids fight
by Mia LightStandard Speaker
May 7th, 2008
TAMAQUA — The borough is standing behind neighbor East Brunswick Township in defense of the township’s ordinance that bans biosolid dumping.
Campbell rejects biosolids ordinance
by Sarah WatsonNews & Advance
April 18th, 2008
Campbell County supervisors rejected a controversial biosolids ordinance Tuesday that would ban corporations from spreading biosolids.
East Brunswick protesters heard by Pa. Attorney General Group protests lawsuit against township's sludge ordinance
by Al DietzTimes News
February 23rd, 2008
One huge banner read, "Attorney General Corbett, State Senator Rhoades, Legislator David Argall, East Brunswick Township does not consent to be sludge."
Sidebar Corbett petition
by Al DietzTimes News
February 23rd, 2008
We, the residents of East Brunswick Township, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, are outraged that the General Assembly has empowered the Attorney General to sue municipalities for passing local laws which protect community residents and our environment.
Dozens protest sludge lawsuit
by Ben WolfgangRepublican Herald
February 19th, 2008
Passed by East Brunswick Township supervisors in 2006, the sludge ordinance challenges the rights of corporations to spread sewage sludge...
East Brunswick residents plan protest of Attorney General Pottsville visit
by Joe PlaskoTimes News
February 18th, 2008
"Attorney General says there is no unalienable right to self-government in his latest legal reply to East Brunswick Township," said Annette Etchberger of the Concerned Citizens group...
The Anti-Local Government History behind Act 38
by Community Environmental Legal Defense FundBRIEF OF RESPONDENTS IN OPPOSITION TO APPLICATION FOR SUMMARY RELIEF NO. 476 M.D. 2007
November 15th, 2007
The General Assembly’s enactment of Act 38 did not occur in a vacuum. It was the result of a six-year effort by the agribusiness and sewage sludge-hauling industries to eliminate lawmaking authority exercised by rural municipal governments.
First challenge set today with sludge ordinance
by Joe PlaskoLehighton Times-News
November 15th, 2007
The ordinance, passed by the East Brunswick Supervisors last year, prohibits land applications of sewer sludge in the township.
Supervisors stand behind biosolids ordinance
by Joe PlaskoLehighton Times-News
October 23rd, 2007
Residents filled the East Brunswick Township meeting room to listen to the supervisors reiterate their support for the biosolids ordinance.
Epic Battle in Pennsylvania: Corporate Agribusiness Versus Local Democracy
by Ben PriceOrganic Consumers Association
May 11th, 2007
Residents Eject Deputy Attorney General from Rural Township. They Refuse To Surrender Self-Governance To AG's Threat.
E. Brunswick citizens vow to back ban
by Shawn A. HessingerRepublican Herald
May 11th, 2007
Deputy Attorney General Michael T. Killion heard from more than 75 residents from East Brunswick Township and surrounding communities Thursday night.
Sludge ordinance to be challenged by Atty. Gen.
by Joe PlaskoLehighton Times-News
May 11th, 2007
An ordinance adopted by East Brunswick Township regulating the use of sewer sludge in the municipality could be headed for a court challenge by the commonwealth's Attorney General's office.
Sewage sludge affects more than just farmers
by John WiydaRepublican Herald
April 17th, 2007
The government is allowing corporations to run this country and they are destroying it and we all know why — it’s all about money. If the government won’t protect us, give us our “inherited” right of local self-governance back and we will do the job ourselves. The world will definitely be a better place.
OPEN LETTER TO EAST BRUNSWICK TOWNSHIP SUPERVISORS
by Annette EtchbergerRepublican Herald
The East Brunswick Sewage Sludge Ordinance, at the request and insistence of the Township citizens, became law on December 6, 2006. The citizens were concerned that we were lacking the legal protections necessary to safeguard residents’ health, safety and welfare, and the Ordinance, now that it is law, will do just that if it is enforced.
Has there been any “biosolids” brought into East Brunswick?
by Annette EtchbergerRepublican Herald
April 4th, 2007
It’s up to the people of East Brunswick to decide if we want hazardous sewage sludge in our community. If not, it’s not a democracy.
Letter to the Editor: Biosolids worry child
by Danielle EtchbergerRepublican & Herald
March 28th, 2007
Courts may see biosolids debate
by Shawn A. HessingerRepublican Herald
March 25th, 2007
The courts will likely decide how to interpret controversial legislation allowing the state attorney general to challenge a local ordinance banning corporate application of biosolids. Meanwhile, residents in Washington Township are pressing for adoption of an ordinance that would go beyond an East Brunswick ban to forbid corporate involvement in agriculture altogether.
Courts may see biosolids debate
by Shawn A. HessingerRepublican & Herald
March 25th, 2007
The courts will likely decide how to interpret controversial legislation allowing the state attorney general to challenge a local ordinance banning corporate application of biosolids.
PA Attorney General Protects Waste Corporations Against Communities
by Annette Etchberger
March 17th, 2007
Pennsylvania Attorney General Thomas Corbett recently sent a letter to the East Brunswick Townsip Board of Supervisors, suggesting that an Ordinance passed at the urging of community residents in 2006 to stop the land application of sewage sludge would draw a law suit from the Attorney General’s office. Mr. Corbett wrote : “We are prepared to bring legal action against the Township
Potential sludge run-off feared
by Donald R. SerfassLehighton Times-News
March 13th, 2007
If toxin-laden sludge is dumped in Schuylkill Township, how will Tamaqua residents be protected from the subsequent run-off, especially when the Wabash Creek passes directly through backyards, beneath homes, and even through restaurant cellars?
Ban on biosolids sought
by Shawn A. HessingerRepublican & Herald
March 13th, 2007
PINE GROVE - A Washington Township group wants biosolids banned - even if it must defy the Pennsylvania Attorney General to do so.
Ordinance repeal leads to dropping of lawsuit
by Jim HookChambersburg Public Opinion
March 2nd, 2007
Commonwealth Court recently determined that Corbett has the right under ACRE to challenge township ordinances.
By unanimous vote, Tamaqua adopts sludge ordinance
by Donald R. SerfassTimes News
September 20th, 2006
Tamaqua may be positioning itself to challenge limits in protecting residents of the community.
Press Release: PA Borough Strips Sludge Corporations of “Rights,” First Municipality in U.S. to Recognize the Rights of Nature
September 20th, 2006
On September 19th, the Tamaqua Borough Council in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, unanimously passed a law declaring that sludge and dredge corporations possess no constitutional “rights” within the Borough. Tamaqua thus becomes the fifth local government in the country to abolish the illegitimate “rights” and privileges claimed by corporations. The Tamaqua law also (1) bans corporations from engaging in the land application of sludge within the Borough; (2) recognizes that ecosystems in Tamaqua possess enforceable rights against corporations; (3) asserts that corporations doing business in Tamaqua will henceforth be treated as “state actors” under the law, and thus, be required to respect the rights of people and natural communities within the Borough